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accidental cutup of hilarity
Monday, January 25th 2016 2:05am
Tags: mp3, collage, sound, audio, cutup

I'm not entirely sure why this cracks me up so much, but I was cutting up some audio for a futel project and accidentally created this mess.  Enjoy my sloppy mistakes and giggle with me...

(source)

ALSA recording of device output
Saturday, January 2nd 2016 11:54pm
Tags: linux, audio, sound, alsa, looprec

On more than a few occasions, I've wanted to be able to software-record the sound coming out of my computer speakers.  Many users faced with similar problems resort to using pulseaudio as their sound system, which is reasonble, because it provides a very extensible/pluggable framework for sound.  Unfortunately, my experience with pulseaudio in the past has been "meh", probably due in large part to my heavy use of Pd.  So I've stuck with ALSA through the years when doing simple stuff, resorting to jack when doing more complicated routing between applications.  Simply recording what's playing seems simple enough...right?  Not so much...

I guess some (nicer?) sound cards provide a built-in hardware recording channel that can mix back in the currently playing audio.  Most built-in ones, like the one in my aging T410, do not.  After some sleuthing, I discovered that ALSA's plugin system does, in fact, provide a way to do this.  I'll describe the process here, but it's basically ripped from this thread where kokoko3k serves up the right approach:  https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=147852

There's an ALSA kernel module called snd_aloop that "provides a pair of cross-connected devices, forming a full-duplex loopback soundcard".  With just a little fiddling, you can create a "looprec" device that has loops back the audio output into a new recordable ALSA device.  The steps, just like in the above-mentioned post, are:

  1. $ sudo modprobe snd_aloop
    (this inserts the relevant kernel module into the kernel)
  2. create/edit ~/.asoundrc and paste in the following (a bit of alsa black magic):
    pcm.!default {
      type asym
      playback.pcm "LoopAndReal"
      #capture.pcm "looprec"
      capture.pcm "hw:0,0"
    }
    

    pcm.looprec { type hw card "Loopback" device 1 subdevice 0 }

    pcm.LoopAndReal { type plug slave.pcm mdev route_policy "duplicate" }

    pcm.mdev { type multi slaves.a.pcm pcm.MixReale slaves.a.channels 2 slaves.b.pcm pcm.MixLoopback slaves.b.channels 2 bindings.0.slave a bindings.0.channel 0 bindings.1.slave a bindings.1.channel 1 bindings.2.slave b bindings.2.channel 0 bindings.3.slave b bindings.3.channel 1 }

    pcm.MixReale { type dmix ipc_key 1024 slave { pcm "hw:0,0" rate 48000 #rate 44100 periods 128 period_time 0 period_size 1024 # must be power of 2 buffer_size 8192 } }

    pcm.MixLoopback { type dmix ipc_key 1025 slave { pcm "hw:Loopback,0,0" rate 48000 #rate 44100 periods 128 period_time 0 period_size 1024 # must be power of 2 buffer_size 8192 } }

That's it!  Your recording software should now have a device available called "looprec", and if you record from it you'll get whatever is playing on your speakers.  You can make this permanent by adding the snd_aloop module to /etc/modprobe.d/sound.conf.

Since you've made it this far, I'll share what I was trying to record:  http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901 -- which is pretty much the raddest thing ever.

This is great.  If you're interested in active listening, field recordings, soundscapes, or amibent sound/music, this is a pretty good primer and talks about the origins of the term "acoustic ecology" as a movement.

In observance of World Listening Day 2014 (July 18th), I guided a lunchtime soundwalk around parts of downtown Portland, OR.  I decided to organize only at the last minute, and there were 5 of us who showed up for the nearly hour long sound walk.

We started with short discussion about active listening and purposeful sound observation and some of the philosophy/ideas behind it.  We walked and listened for about 20 minutes, then had a short chat about what we had noticed so far and what we thought was interesting in the act of observing.  We continued on for another 35 minutes or so and completed a wide loop. The small group of participants seemed to have a really good time (and it turned out to be some decent exercise too).

I recorded the walk on my binaural in-ear microphones with a Zoom H2.  The raw recording is available on archive.org:  Portland, OR World Listening Day Soundwalk.

Embedded here:

See you next year for World Listening Day!